In the final paragraph of this section on Aristotle’s Metaphysics, Deleuze seeks to clarify the point he has just made. Generic / categorical difference and specific difference are not identical, he repeats, but they are, nevertheless, co-constitutive; “the univocity of species in a common genus,” he writes, “refers back to the equivocity of being in the various genera: the one …

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Deleuze ends the paragraph at the top of pg. 33 with a series of questions regarding an alternative concept of difference—that is, generic or categorical difference as the key to understanding “Difference in Itself.” This is something of a ruse, however. Deleuze has already shown—through prose that is torturous to a non-specialist—that specific difference, which Aristotle defines as the …

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Deleuze ends the paragraph at the top of pg. 33 with a series of questions regarding an alternative concept of difference—that is, generic or categorical difference as the key to understanding “Difference in Itself.” This is something of a ruse, however. Deleuze has already shown—through prose that is torturous to a non-specialist—that specific difference, which Aristotle defines as the …

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The Road Thus Far, or What Do the Guides Say? What do other commentators make of Deleuze’s summary/critique of Aristotle? In his Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition: A Critical Guide and Introduction, James Williams writes: According to Aristotle, difference is more than otherness or diversity—it is opposition. In opposition, it reaches its greatest form in contraries. Furthermore, …

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The Road Thus Far, or What Do the Guides Say? What do other commentators make of Deleuze’s summary/critique of Aristotle? In his Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition: A Critical Guide and Introduction, James Williams writes: According to Aristotle, difference is more than otherness or diversity—it is opposition. In opposition, it reaches its greatest form in contraries. Furthermore, …

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